October, 2013

N.J.’s youngest medical marijuana patient gets her turn

Star-Ledger – Today, New Jersey’s youngest medical marijuana patient, 2-1/2-year-old Vivian Wilson, left the Compassionate Care Foundation medical marijuana dispensary in a stroller with a stuffed dog. Her parents, Brian and Meghan Wilson of Scotch Plains, left with a little more hope than they had the day before.

 

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Medical marijuana users fear having to buy state-approved pot

King 5 – Jeffrey Craighead has diabetes and multiple sclerosis. The Army veteran also suffers from post traumatic stress disorder. He says only one medicine seem to work for him: marijuana. He’s worried he won’t have access to his medicine soon, at least not legally. ”Facial twitches, crossed eyes, using a cane to walk,” said Craighead. “None of that exists for me anymore.”’ Craighead does not smoke traditional marijuana. From the back porch of his Tacoma apartment he extracts oils from the plant, creating a hash oil concentrate. It gives him the stronger dose he said he needs to control his ailments. Craighead is afraid he won’t get the same effect from the recreational pot the state is going to license for sale next year. Lawmakers asked three state agencies to submit a list of recommendations on how to regulate the medical marijuana industry. The Liquor Control Board, the Department of Health and the Department of Revenue released a list of potential recommendations this week. On the list: banning home grow operations and eliminating collective gardens, the clinics where most current medical marijuana users are able to select from a number of different strains of marijuana or pot-related items.

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Connecticut’s new law called one of the strictest in the nation

The Day – Lawmakers, lawyers, doctors and prospective growers and dispensers of the drug attended the event aimed at demystifying the state’s medical marijuana policy, which its creators say is one of the strictest in the country. Twenty states and the District of Columbia have approved the use of medical marijuana. The state Department of Consumer Protection, which plans to issues licenses to three to 10 producers of medical marijuana and three to five dispensary facilities, is accepting applications through Nov. 15. The department plans to award licenses around the first of the year and says the production and dispensary facilities could be operational by spring.

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For First Time, Americans Favor Legalizing Marijuana

Gallup – For marijuana advocates, the last 12 months have been a period of unprecedented success as Washington and Colorado became the first states to legalize recreational use of marijuana. And now for the first time, a clear majority of Americans (58%) say the drug should be legalized. This is in sharp contrast to the time Gallup first asked the question in 1969, when only 12% favored legalization.

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Colo. Pot Industry on Display at Drug-Policy Talks

Associated Press – Dignitaries from three nations sniffed marijuana, walked through greenhouses full of tagged marijuana plants and learned about video pot surveillance on a three-day Weed 101 tour in Colorado, which has a regulated marijuana market and is planning to expand sales to all adults in a few weeks.

 

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Like gay marriage, medical marijuana is here to stay

Los Angeles Times – The consumption of marijuana, practically speaking, is legal in California, and has been since voters passed an initiative legalizing it for medical use in 1996. Despite the failure in 2010 of a ballot initiative that would have legalized the recreational use of pot, everyone and his brother knows that if you want or need to use the drug, legal barriers are mere technicalities. These days, pot is as ubiquitous a social lubricant as pinot noir.

 

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Patients in veterans homes would have easier access to medical marijuana under law

Associated Press – Sick military veterans who want medical marijuana would get it more easily under legislation that’s getting committee approval. The House Judiciary Committee sent Rep. Lou Lang’s bill to the floor for consideration. The Skokie Democrat is the sponsor of Illinois’ first law legalizing the use of medical marijuana. Gov. Pat Quinn signed it in August. But it requires a sick person to get a letter from a doctor. Veterans home doctors are federal employees — barred from approving cannabis use. Lang’s legislation would allow veterans to get a letter from the Illinois Department of Public Health certifying he or she has a condition that qualifies for marijuana treatment under the law. The committee voted 10-6 to move the bill to the House floor.

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